Anmäl dig till vår genetikstudie

Nu är vår studie av OCD (tvångssyndrom), BDD (dysmorfofobi), samlarsyndrom och tics/Tourettes öppen för att du kan anmäla dig själv oavsett om du har tidigare diagnos eller inte. Du anmäler dig på ocdgenetik.se och svarar på frågor och får sedan ett DNA-salivkit hemskickat. Mer info på sidan.

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Data Science for Mental Health Transfer Learning Roundtable

This week RISE/KTH arranged a roundtable on AI in mental heath research with participants from KI, KTH, Stockholm University and KCL, UCL and Anna Freud Institute in London. We are starting in this exiting field now.

 

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Doctor Evelyn Andersson Hagen!

Congrats Evelyn! She is the 4th PhD student to graduate from our lab and she defended her thesis very well the past Friday. Big thank you to everyone involved!

 

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Evelyn in defense mode.
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From left: Co-supervisor Erik Hedman-Lagerlöf, examination board member Lisa Thorell, main supervisor Christian Rück, Evelyn, co-supervisor Martin Schalling and Cattis Lavebratt, opponent Jönsson, examination board member Lars Westberg and session chair Viktor Kaldo.
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Party!
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Winning shoes!
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Opponent Erik Jönsson, Oslo University.
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ICBT FTW!

Evelyn nailed it!

Evelyn Andersson Hagen today nailed her thesis at the KI Library. This is symbol of her thesis now being out in the public. She will defend her thesis June 1st. Everyone is welcome! Details here.

Big thanks to all the participants of the studies, the involved clinicians of Internetpsykiatrienheten and to the co-supervisors Nils Lindefors, Martin Schalling, Catharina Lavebratt and Erik Hedman-Lagerlöf.

The thesis is here (pdf).

 

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‘Game-Changing’ Depression Study Discovers 44 Genes

Skärmavbild 2018-05-03 kl. 22.04.39

 

We are proud that a landmark study of depression genetics published in Nature Genetics has Professor Manuel Mattheisen as one of the lead authors. Manuel is a Professor at Würzburg University but also affiliated to our group at Karolinska Institutet.

The authors conducted a genome-wide association meta-analysis based in 135,458 cases and 344,901 controls and identified 44 independent and significant loci. The genetic findings were associated with clinical features of major depression and implicated brain regions exhibiting anatomical differences in cases. Targets of antidepressant medications and genes involved in gene splicing were enriched for smaller association signal. We found important relationships of genetic risk for major depression with educational attainment, body mass, and schizophrenia: lower educational attainment and higher body mass were putatively causal, whereas major depression and schizophrenia reflected a partly shared biological etiology. All humans carry lesser or greater numbers of genetic risk factors for major depression. These findings help refine the basis of major depression and imply that a continuous measure of risk underlies the clinical phenotype.

Here is a commentary in The Guardian.

Nature Genetics volume 50pages 668–681 (2018)

Full paper: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41588-018-0090-3