Long-term outcomes after internet-delivered CBT for body dysmorphic disorder

Our lab has a new publication in BMJ Open where we look at two-year outcomes after internet-delivered CBT for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD-NET). The results were promising: we saw further improvements in BDD symptoms and 56% of participants no longer had BDD at the two-year follow-up.

A notable and perhaps surprising finding is that 29% of participants had a delayed response: they were not classified as treatment responders at post-treatment but were treatment responders at follow-up. We discuss this in the publication: “Perhaps participants continued to employ the techniques that they had acquired during the acute treatment phase in their daily lives, in part explaining the additional improvements seen in BDD symptoms during the follow-up.”

We conclude that BDD-NET is an effective treatment and that gains are sustained in the long term. However, since the follow-up was uncontrolled we cannot say that BDD-NET caused these improvements, and we also note that all participants were self-referred and motivated to do the treatment. The results are nonetheless encouraging and we will continue to evaluate BDD-NET as a treatment in different contexts.

Full citation: Enander, J., Ljótsson, B., Anderhell, L., Runeborg, M., Flygare, O., Cottman, O., … Rück, C. (2019). Long-term outcome of therapist-guided internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD-NET): a naturalistic 2-year follow-up after a randomised controlled trial. BMJ Open9(1), e024307. https://doi.org/10.1136/bmjopen-2018-024307

Sudden gains in internet-delivered CBT for obsessive-compulsive disorder

sudden-gains-title

In our most recent paper, published in the Journal of Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders, we investigate sudden gains in internet-based CBT for OCD. A sudden gain means a large improvement in symptoms between two therapy sessions (i.e. weeks in internet-based CBT), that is stable once the improvement has taken place. We used data from a previous trial where 128 participants received internet-based CBT.

sudden-gains-fig

We found that 38% of the patients experienced a sudden gain. Sudden gainers showed significantly larger improvements on the clinician-administered Y-BOCS than non-sudden gainers at post-treatment (d = 1.11), as well as at 3-month (d = 1.06), 12-month (d = 0.88) and 24-month follow-up (d = 0.77). Sudden gainers also showed significantly less severe OCD symptoms than gradual gainers at post-treatment (d = 0.50), as well as 3-month (d = 0.55) and 12-month follow-up (d = 0.57). In addition, patients receiving DCS showed a significantly higher rate of sudden gains.

We conclude that sudden gains are common in ICBT for OCD and are associated with favourable short and long-term treatment outcomes. Sudden gains is something we will be investigating further in our other clinical trials for OCD and related disorders.

Can genes predict outcome in CBT?

In a new study by our group, we showed for the first time an association of a polygenetic signal and outcome in CBT. The study was published in Molecular Psychiatry and included 894 individuals with depression who underwent 12 weeks of internet based CBT. Single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping arrays were used to calculate the genomic risk scores based on large genetic studies of six phenotypes: major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorder, intelligence, and educational attainment. The relationships between the six genetic risk scores and cognitive behavior therapy outcome was analyzed. Our analyses yielded one significant interaction effect (B = 0.09, p < 0.001): the autism spectrum disorder genetic risk score correlated with Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale-Self Rated changes during treatment, and the higher the autism spectrum disorder genetic load, the less the depressive symptoms decreased over time.  Our preliminary results indicated, as expected, that the genomics of the response of patients with major depression to cognitive behavior therapy were complex and that future efforts should aim to maximize sample size and limit subject heterogeneity in order to gain a better understanding of the use of genetic risk factors to predict treatment outcome.

For full text: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41380-018-0289-9

Andersson E, Crowley JJ, Lindefors N, Ljótsson B, Hedman-Lagerlöf E, Boberg J, El Alaoui S, Karlsson R, Lu Y, Mattheisen M, Kähler AK, Svanborg C, Mataix-Cols D, Mattsson S, Forsell E, Kaldo V, Schalling M, Lavebratt C, Sullivan PF, Rück C. Genetics of response to cognitive behavior therapy in adults with major depression: a preliminary report. Molecular Psychiatry. 2018

 

 

 

SweSRII 2018

 

Participants SweSRII 2018 Växjö Linnéuniversitetet
The participants of SweSRII 2018

The yearly conference for research on internet interventions took place in Växjö, att Linnaeus University, on 9th November. The meeting brought together researchers and practitioners from Sweden, Norway and Denmark to present and discuss recent developments and upcoming projects. The Rücklab team was represented by Oskar and Katja.

With a familial atmosphere and representation from both academia and health care, the conference provided a great opportunity to discuss common struggles and potential improvements of our treatment interventions. Some highlights of the programme include individually tailored treatments for patients with multiple psychiatric conditions, the use of emergent technologies like virtual reality to treat mental illness, and disseminating internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy in rural settings.

We had a great time and look forward to exchanging ideas and collaborating on project with our colleagues from all over Sweden and elsewhere. Next up is esrii 2019 in Copenhagen!

Funding from the Swedish Research Council

Good news! The Swedish Research Council (Vetenskapsrådet) has awarded us 2.4 million SEK over the next 3 years for our PRiMED-study (Predicting Response to CBT in Mental Disorders using multimodal data and machine learning). Bild1

Anmäl dig till vår genetikstudie

Nu är vår studie av OCD (tvångssyndrom), BDD (dysmorfofobi), samlarsyndrom och tics/Tourettes öppen för att du kan anmäla dig själv oavsett om du har tidigare diagnos eller inte. Du anmäler dig på ocdgenetik.se och svarar på frågor och får sedan ett DNA-salivkit hemskickat. Mer info på sidan.

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New study: Adapted CBT for adults with OCD and ASD

We have just released a pre-print1 where we describe an adapted cognitive behavior therapy for adults with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). You can find the full paper here.

OCD and ASD often co-occur but effective treatment options for this patient group are sorely lacking. We extended an adapted CBT protocol developed in the UK at our specialist clinic for OCD and related disorders (OCD-programmet).

Our results show that OCD-symptoms (both when rated by a clinician and by the participants themselves) decrease over the course of treatment, but that few participants were completely symptom free.

ybocs-compare
Results on the main outcome: Yale-Brown Obsessive-compulsive Scale (YBOCS) rated by clinicians.

We discuss three ways to develop the treatment further: adding more support in between sessions to help participants do exposure exercises on their own, including interventions to help participants find meaningful daily activities, and intensifying the treatment over a shorter time span.

If you are interested in learning more, you can find the pre-print at the pre-print server PsyArXiv.


  1. A pre-print is a manuscript that has been read and approved by all authors but has not gone through peer-review yet. It’s a popular way to quickly disseminate results in fields like genetics, physics and mathematics. It is gaining popularity in other fields as well. Wikipedia article ↩︎

Internet-KBT för tvångssyndrom och dysmorfofobi i reguljär vård

Nu finns internet-KBT för tvångssyndrom (OCD) och dysmorfofobi (BDD) tillgängligt för vuxna personer i hela Sverige!

Vi har utvecklat och utvärderat dessa behandlingar i flera vetenskapliga studier sedan 2011 (OCD) respektive 2014 (BDD) och funnit att de fungerar bra vid båda tillstånden. Det slutgiltiga målet har alltid varit att fler patienter ska få tillgång till effektiv behandling och vi är stolta över att ha nått fram till den här punkten.

Lina Lundström är den person som varit projektledare för implementeringen i reguljär vård och det är tack vare hennes ihärdiga arbete som behandlingarna nu finns tillgängliga.

Instruktioner för egenanmälan till behandlingen

Boende i Stockholms län kan logga in via Vårdguidens e-tjänster för att anmäla sitt intresse för behandling.

Data Science for Mental Health Transfer Learning Roundtable

This week RISE/KTH arranged a roundtable on AI in mental heath research with participants from KI, KTH, Stockholm University and KCL, UCL and Anna Freud Institute in London. We are starting in this exiting field now.

 

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