Doctoral (PhD) student position in Precision Psychiatry

📣 We are looking for a PhD student interested in Precision Psychiatry to join our team! 📣

The overarching purpose of your PhD project is to improve routine-care predictions of post cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) outcomes for common mental disorders. Our developed prediction models will be focused on avoiding unnecessary treatment failures, minimizing adverse long-term health and socioeconomic events, and promoting effective use of psychiatric resources. Today, there is a general lack of accurate prognostic risk tools implemented in routine psychiatric care, which directly hampers our possibilities for timely and cost-effective tailored intervention and care. The main objective of your PhD project is thus to construct and validate prediction models for both clinical CBT outcomes and long-term register outcomes using the world’s largest multimodal database in the field (clinical, register-linked, and genetic data) including 5,000 individuals treated with CBT.

You will be supervised by John Wallert and co-supervised by Christian Rück.

Click here to read more and apply.

Grant from the Swedish Research Council

A member of our Research Group, John Wallert, recently received a 4.5 million SEK grant from the Swedish Research Council (Vetenskapsrådet, VR) for his project about suicide among compulsory mental care

The project is a collaboration with Oxford University and involves studying risk factors for suicide in a cohort of more than 100 000 compulsory mental Care acts (Lagen om psykiatrisk tvångsvård, LPT, in Swedish), using 40 years of unique national register data.

Congratulations! 

Two new publications:

On iCBT for Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression After Myocardial Infarction, and Cognitive Dedifferentiation in Abnormal Cognitive Decline

This week, John Wallert published not one but two articles! 🎉

  1. Internet-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Patients Reporting Symptoms of Anxiety and Depression After Myocardial Infarction: U-CARE Heart Randomized Controlled Trial Twelve-Month Follow-up

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy on self-reported symptoms of anxiety and depression in patients 12 months after a myocardial infarction and to explore subsequent occurrences of cardiovascular disease events. Shortly after acute myocardial infarction, 239 patients reporting mild-to-moderate symptoms of anxiety or depression were randomized to 14 weeks of therapist-guided internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (n=117) or treatment as usual (n=122). 

    The study’s conclusions was that internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy was not superior in reducing self-reported symptoms of depression or anxiety compared to treatment as usual at the 1-year follow-up after myocardial infarction. A reduction in cardiac-related anxiety was observed but was not significant after adjusting for multiple comparisons. There was no difference in risk of cardiovascular events between the treatment groups. Low treatment adherence, which might have affected treatment engagement and outcomes, should be considered when interpreting these results.

  2. Cognitive dedifferentiation as a function of cognitive impairment in the ADNI and MemClin cohorts

    The cause of cognitive dedifferentiation has been suggested as specific to late-life abnormal cognitive decline rather than a general feature of aging. This hypothesis was tested in two large cohorts with different characteristics. The subjects came from two research databases in North America and Sweden. Dedifferentiation was explained by cognitive impairment when controlling for age, sex, and education. This finding replicated across two separate, large cohorts of older individuals. Knowledge that the structure of human cognition becomes less diversified and more dependent on general intelligence as a function of cognitive impairment should inform clinical assessment and care for these patients as their neurodegeneration progresses.